Employers Must File Forms W-2 by Jan. 31 This Year

Sayed_Block_Profile

All material below original published by IRS. For help with tax law for personal or business matters, call Kevin M Sayed, J.D., LL.M. taxation at 252-321-2020.

Issue Number:  IR-2017-13

The Internal Revenue Service today reminds employers that the due date for filing Forms W-2, the Wage and Tax Statement for their employees for calendar year 2016, is now Jan, 31, 2017. Also, those who hire contract workers and have to file Form 1099-MISC now must file by Jan. 31.

The new deadline applies whether an employer e-files or files a paper Form W-2. Employers who pay an employee $600 or more for the year must file a Form W-2 for each employee with the Social Security Administration.

The new deadline is part of legislation signed into law at the end of 2015 to combat identity-theft related refund fraud.

The Social Security Administration encourages all employers to e-file their Forms W-2 by using its Business Services Online.  Employers who file paper Forms W-2 should file them with the Social Security Administration, Data Operations Center, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18769-0001.

E-filing can save time and effort and helps ensure accuracy. Employers must e-file if they file 250 or more Forms W-2 or W-2c. Employers who are required to e-file but fail to do so may incur a penalty. E-filing can save time and effort and helps ensure accuracy.

The IRS projects that employers will file more than 250 million Forms W-2 this year; the vast majority will be e-filed.

The new rule does not affect the filing deadline for other types of Form 1099 or Forms 1097, 1098, 3921, 3922, or W-2G, which are filed on paper by Feb. 28, 2018, or by April 2, 2018 if filed electronically.

Get Ready to Pay $500 More in Taxes?

Sayed_Block_Profile

Check out this link below to an article published by Bloomberg and Yahoo Finance. If you are a small business owner and want to learn about ways to save on increases in the social security tax and payroll taxes, and how to save on taxes in general as a small business owner, contact Kevin Sayed, J.D., LL.M. Taxation, at 252-321-2020 with Colombo Kitchin Attorneys. Over 12 million Americans will pay more tax this year on the exact same amount of earning as last year.

https://www.yahoo.com/finance/news/ready-pay-500-more-taxes-090016482.html

Ten Key Tax Tips for Farmers and Ranchers

Sayed_Block_Profile

 All material originally published by the IRS as, IRS Tax Tip 2016-15:  Ten Key Tax Tips for Farmers and Ranchers. For help with tax planning, business planning, or estate planning for farmers contact Kevin M Sayed, J.D., LL.M. Taxation, at 252-321-2020, or ksayed@ck-attorneys.com, with Colombo Kitchin attorneys.

Ten Key Tax Tips for Farmers and Ranchers

Farms include ranches, ranges and orchards. While some may raise cattle, poultry or fish and others grow fruits or vegetables, all will report their farm income on Schedule F, Profit or Loss from Farming. If you own a farm or ranch, here are 10 tax tips:

  1. Crop insurance. Insurance payments from crop damage count as income. Generally, you should report these payments in the year you get them.
  2. Sale of items purchased for resale.  If you sold livestock or items that you bought for resale, you must report the sale. Your profit or loss is the difference between your selling price and your basis in the item. Basis is usually the cost of the item. Your cost may also include other expenses such as sales tax and freight.
  3. Weather-related sales. Bad weather such as a drought or flood may force you to sell more livestock than you normally would in a year. If so, you may defer tax on the gain from the sale of the extra animals.
  4. Farm expenses. Farmers can deduct ordinary and necessary expenses they paid for their business. An ordinary expense is a common and accepted cost for that type of business. A necessary expense means a cost that is proper for that business.
  5. Employee wages. You can deduct wages you paid to your farm’s full- and part-time workers. You must withhold Social Security, Medicare and income taxes from their wages.
  6. Loan repayment. You can only deduct the interest you paid on a loan if the loan is used for your farming business. You can’t deduct interest you paid on a personal loan.
  7. Net operating losses.  If your expenses are more than income for the year, you may have a net operating loss. You can carry that loss over to other years and deduct it. You may get a refund of part or all of the income tax you paid in prior years. You may also be able to lower your tax in future years.
  8. Farm income averaging.  You may be able to average some or all of the current year’s farm income by spreading it out over the past three years. This may cut your taxes if your farm income is high in the current year and low in the prior three years.
  9. Tax credit or refund.  You may be able to claim a tax credit or refund of excise taxes you paid on fuel used on your farm for farming purposes.
  10. Farmers Tax Guide. For more details on this topic see Publication 225, Farmer’s Tax Guide. You can get it on IRS.gov/forms anytime. You can order it on IRS.gov/orderforms to have it mailed to you.

 

Who Can Represent You Before the IRS?

Sayed_Block_Profile

Please call Kevin M. Sayed, J.D., LL.M. Taxation, with Colombo Kitchen attorneys for help with representation before the IRS (252-321-2020).  All material here originally published by the Internal Revenue Service.

Issue Number:  IRS Special Edition Tax Tip 2016-02

Inside This Issue

Who Can Represent You Before the IRS?

Many people use a tax professional to prepare their taxes. Tax professionals with an IRS Preparer Tax Identification Number (PTIN) can prepare a return for a fee. If you choose a tax pro, you should know who can represent you before the IRS. There are new rules this year, so the IRS wants you to know who can represent you and when they can represent you. Choose a tax return preparer wisely.

Representation rights, also known as practice rights, fall into two categories:

  • Unlimited Representation
  • Limited Representation

Unlimited representation rights allow a credentialed tax practitioner to represent you before the IRS on any tax matter. This is true no matter who prepared your return. Credentialed tax professionals who have unlimited representation rights include:

Limited representation rights authorize the tax professional to represent you if, and only if, they prepared and signed the return. They can do this only before IRS revenue agents, customer service representatives and similar IRS employees. They cannot represent clients whose returns they did not prepare. They cannot represent clients regarding appeals or collection issues even if they did prepare the return in question. For returns filed after Dec. 31, 2015, the only tax return preparers with limited representation rights are Annual Filing Season Program Participants.

The Annual Filing Season Program is a voluntary program. Non-credentialed tax return preparers who aim for a higher level of professionalism are encouraged to participate.

Other tax return preparers have limited representation rights, but only for returns filed before Jan. 1, 2016. Keep these changes in mind and choose wisely when you select a tax return preparer.

Each and every taxpayer has a set of fundamental rights they should be aware of when dealing with the IRS. These are your Taxpayer Bill of Rights. Explore your rights and our obligations to protect them on IRS.gov.

Tax Filing Extension Expires October 15th

Sayed_Block_Profile

For help with tax disputes and overdue taxes with the IRS, NCDOR, or with income, gift, trust or estate tax planning, call Kevin M. Sayed, J.D., LL.M. Taxation, at 252-321-2020.

Excerpt from the IRS publication at the following website – http://www.irs.gov/uac/Newsroom/Tax-Filing-Extension-Expires-Oct.-15-for-Millions-of-Taxpayers;-Check-Eligibility-for-Overlooked-Tax-Benefits

IRS YouTube Videos                                                                                        Oct. 15 Tax Deadline: English | Spanish | ASL IRS Tax Payment Options: English | Spanish | ASL IRS2Go 5.2: English | Spanish | ASL Online Payment Agreement: English | Spanish | ASL

IR-2015-109, Sept. 28, 2015

WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service today urged taxpayers whose tax-filing extension runs out on Oct. 15 to double check their returns for often-overlooked tax benefits and then file their returns electronically using IRS e-file or the Free File system.

About a quarter of the 13 million taxpayers who requested an automatic six-month extension this year have yet to file. Although Oct. 15 is the last day for most people, some still have more time, including members of the military and others serving in combat zone localities who typically have until at least 180 days after they leave the combat zone to both file returns and pay any taxes due.

“If you still need to file, don’t forget that you can still file electronically through October 15,” said IRS Commissioner John Koskinen. “Many people may not realize they may be eligible to use Free File available on IRS.gov/freefile. Free File is free tax software that takes the guesswork out of return preparation. Even if you’re filing in the final days, filing electronically remains easy, safe and the most accurate way to file your taxes.”

 

Ten Facts that you should know about Capital Gains and Losses

Sayed_Block_Profile

 

 

 

 

Issue Number:    IRS Tax Tip 2015-21

 

When you sell a capital asset the sale results in a capital gain or loss. A capital asset includes most property you own for personal use or own as an investment. Here are 10 facts that you should know about capital gains and losses:

  1. Capital Assets.  Capital assets include property such as your home or car, if you have been in Automobile Accident then contact us, as well as investment property, such as stocks and bonds.
  2. Gains and Losses.  A capital gain or loss is the difference between your basis and the amount you get when you sell an asset. Your basis is usually what you paid for the asset.
  3. Net Investment Income Tax.  You must include all capital gains in your income and you may be subject to the Net Investment Income Tax. This tax applies to certain net investment income of individuals, estates and trusts that have income above statutory threshold amounts. The rate of this tax is 3.8 percent. For details visit IRS.gov.
  4. Deductible Losses.  You can deduct capital losses on the sale of investment property. You cannot deduct losses on the sale of property that you hold for personal use.
  5. Long and Short Term. Capital gains and losses are either long-term or short-term, depending on how long you held the property. If you held the property for more than one year, your gain or loss is long-term. If you held it one year or less, the gain or loss is short-term.
  6. Net Capital Gain.  If your long-term gains are more than your long-term losses, the difference between the two is a net long-term capital gain. If your net long-term capital gain is more than your net short-term capital loss, you have a net capital gain.
  7. Tax Rate. The capital gains tax rate usually depends on your income. The maximum net capital gain tax rate is 20 percent. However, for most taxpayers a zero or 15 percent rate will apply. A 25 or 28 percent tax rate can also apply to certain types of net capital gains.
  8. Limit on Losses.  If your capital losses are more than your capital gains, you can deduct the difference as a loss on your tax return. This loss is limited to $3,000 per year, or $1,500 if you are married and file a separate return.
  9. Carryover Losses.  If your total net capital loss is more than the limit you can deduct, you can carry over the losses you are not able to deduct to next year’s tax return. You will treat those losses as if they happened in that next year.
  10. Forms to File.  You often will need to file Form 8949, Sales and Other Dispositions of Capital Assets, with your federal tax return to report your gains and losses. You also need to file Schedule D, Capital Gains and Losses with your tax return.

For help structuring transactions to optimize gains and losses, or taxation on capital assets, call Kevin M Sayed, J.D., LL.M. Taxation with Colombo Kitchin Attorneys at 252-321-2020..

 

 

IRS Can Help if W-2s Are Missing

Sayed_Block_Profile

 

 

 

IRS TAX TIP 2015-15

In most cases you get your W-2 forms by the end of January. Form W-2, Wage and Tax Statement, shows your income and the taxes withheld from your pay for the year. You need your W-2 form to file an accurate tax return.

If you haven’t received your form by mid-February, here’s what you should do:

  • Contact your employer.  Ask your employer (or former employer) for a copy. Be sure that they have your correct address.
  • After Feb. 23.  If you can’t get a copy from your employer, call the IRS at 800-829-1040 after Feb. 23. The IRS will send a letter to your employer on your behalf. You’ll need the following when you call:
  • Your name, address, Social Security number and phone number;
  • Your employer’s name, address and phone number;
  • The dates you worked for the employer; and
  • An estimate of your wages and federal income tax withheld in 2014. You can use your final pay stub for these amounts.

Originally published by the IRS. If you have problems with incorrectly reported W-2, 1099, or other income, call Kevin Sayed, J.D., LL.M. Taxation, at 252-321-2020.