Treasury, IRS issue proposed regulations on new Opportunity Zone tax incentive

Please call Kevin Sayed, J.D., LL.M., to discuss the opportunity to defer capital gains taxes, or any other tax planning and business matters.  The following materials were originally published by the IRS.

The Treasury Department and the Internal Revenue Service issued proposed regulations for the new Opportunity Zone tax incentive to clarify that almost all of the associated capital gains qualify for deferral.

Opportunity Zones, created by the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, are designed to spur investment in distressed communities through tax benefits. A nomination process completed in June resulted in the designation of qualified Opportunity Zones in 8,761 communities in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and five U.S. territories. Investors may defer tax on almost any capital gain up to Dec. 31, 2026 by making an appropriate investment in a zone, making an election after Dec. 21, 2017, and meeting other requirements.

More information on Opportunity Zones is available on IRS.gov/taxreform. This page will also feature updates on the implementation of this and other TCJA provisions.

Click here for a complete list of Opportunity Zones.

IRS: Several tax law changes may affect bottom line of many business owners

 

Please call Kevin M. Sayed, J.D., LL.M., with questions about tax issues, about tax issues, and tax or business planning, at 252-321-2020. The following materials were originally published by the IRS.

WASHINGTON —The Internal Revenue Service today reminded business owners that tax reform legislation passed last December affects nearly every business.

With just a few months left in the year, the IRS is highlighting important information for small businesses and self-employed individuals to help them understand and meet their tax obligations.

Here are several changes that could affect the bottom line of many small businesses:

Qualified Business Income Deduction 

Many owners of sole proprietorships, partnerships, trusts and S corporations may deduct 20 percent of their qualified business income. The new deduction — referred to as the Section 199A deduction or the qualified business income deduction — is available for tax years beginning after Dec. 31, 2017. Eligible taxpayers can claim it for the first time on the 2018 federal income tax return they file next year.

A set of FAQs provides more information on the deduction, income and other limitations.

Temporary 100 percent expensing for certain business assets

Businesses are now able to write off most depreciable business assets in the year the business places them in service. The 100-percent depreciation deduction generally applies to depreciable business assets with a recovery period of 20 years or less and certain other property. Machinery, equipment, computers, appliances and furniture generally qualify.

Taxpayers can find more information in the proposed regulations.

Fringe benefits

  • Entertainment and meals: The new law eliminates the deduction for expenses related to entertainment, amusement or recreation. However, taxpayers can continue to deduct 50 percent of the cost of business meals if the taxpayer or an employee of the taxpayer is present and other conditions are met. The meals may be provided to a current or potential business customer, client, consultant or similar business contact.
  • Qualified transportation: The new law disallows deductions for expenses associated with transportation fringe benefits or expenses incurred providing transportation for commuting. There’s an exception when the transportation expenses are necessary for employee safety.
  • Bicycle commuting reimbursements: Employers can deduct qualified bicycle commuting reimbursements as a business expense for 2018 through 2025. The new tax law also suspends the exclusion of qualified bicycle commuting reimbursements from an employee’s income for 2018 through 2025. Employers must now include these reimbursements in the employee’s wages.
  • Qualified moving expenses reimbursements: Reimbursements an employer pays to an employee in 2018 for qualified moving expenses are subject to federal income tax.  Reimbursements incurred in a prior year are not subject to federal income or employment taxes; nor are payments from an employer to a moving company in 2018 for qualified moving services provided to an employee prior to 2018.
  • Employee achievement award: Special rules allow an employee to exclude certain achievement awards from their wages if the awards are tangible personal property. An employer also may deduct awards that are tangible personal property, subject to certain deduction limits. The new law clarifies that tangible personal property doesn’t include cash, cash equivalents, gift cards, gift coupons, certain gift certificates, tickets to theater or sporting events, vacations, meals, lodging, stocks, bonds, securities and other similar items.

The tax reform for businesses page has more information on fringe benefit changes.

Estimated Taxes

Individuals, including sole proprietors, partners and S corporation shareholders, may need to pay quarterly installments of estimated tax unless they owe less than $1,000 when they file their tax return or they had no tax liability in the prior year (subject to certain conditions). More information about tax withholding and estimated taxes can be found on the agency’s Pay As You Go web page as well as in Publication 505, Tax Withholding and Estimated Tax. Publication 505 has additional details, including worksheets and examples, which can help taxpayers determine whether they should pay estimated taxes. Some affected taxpayers may include those who have dividend or capital gain income, owe alternative minimum tax or have other special situations.

More information

See IRS.gov/taxreform for more information about these and many other tax law changes.

New 100-percent depreciation deduction benefits business taxpayers

Please call Kevin M. Sayed, J.D., LL.M., with questions about tax issues, and tax or business planning, at 252-321-2020.  The following materials were originally published by the IRS.

Tax reform legislation passed in December 2017 includes changes that affect businesses. One of these changes allows businesses to write off most depreciable business assets in the year they place them in service.

Here are some facts about this deduction to help businesses better understand how to claim it:

  • The 100-percent depreciation deduction generally applies to depreciable business assets with a recovery period of 20 years or less and certain other property.
  • Machinery, equipment, computers, appliances and furniture generally qualify.
  • The 100-percent depreciation deduction applies to qualifying property acquired and placed in service after Sept. 27, 2017.
  • Taxpayers who elect out of the 100-percent depreciation deduction for a class of property must do so on a timely filed return. Those who have already timely filed their 2017 return and did not elect out can still do so. These taxpayers have six months from the original filing deadline, to file an amended return. For calendar-year corporations, this means Oct. 15, 2018.
  • The IRS issued proposed regulations with guidance on what property qualifies and rules for qualified film, television and live theatrical productions, and certain plants.
  • For details on claiming the 100-percent depreciation deduction or electing out of claiming it, taxpayers should refer to the proposed regulations or the instructions to Form 4562, Depreciation and Amortization.

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For many business taxpayers, time is running out

Please call Kevin M. Sayed, J.D., LL.M., with questions about tax issues, and tax or business planning, at 252-321-2020.  The following materials were originally published by the IRS.

For many business taxpayers, time is running out to elect out of new 100-percent depreciation deduction for 2017

WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service today reminds business taxpayers who placed qualifying property in service during 2017 but choose not to claim the new 100-percent depreciation deduction, that they have a limited time to file the required election with the IRS.

In general, individuals and calendar-year corporations must file the election with the IRS by Oct. 15, 2018. The new 100-percent deduction allows businesses to write off most depreciable business assets in the year they are placed in service. This deduction was created by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA), the tax reform legislation enacted in December 2017. Because the deduction is retroactive and applies to qualifying property acquired and placed in service after Sept. 27, 2017, it may affect many 2017 tax returns. See IRS Fact Sheet 2018-09 for more details.

The 100-percent depreciation deduction generally applies to depreciable business assets with a recovery period of 20 years or less and certain other property. Machinery, equipment, computers, appliances, furniture, certain plants and qualified film, television and live theatrical productions generally qualify. Further details can be found in proposed regulations, issued last month, as well as in Publication 946, How to Depreciate Property, and in Form 4562, Depreciation and Amortization, and its instructions.

Taxpayers who elect out of the 100-percent depreciation deduction, as well as the 50-percent deduction available under prior law, must do so by attaching a statement to a timely-filed return. For details, see the instructions for Part II of Form 4562.

Those who have already timely filed their 2017 return and did not elect out but still wish to do so need to file an amended return. The deadline for filing the election is six months after the original deadline. For individuals or calendar-year corporations, this means Oct. 15, 2018.

For more information about this and other TCJA provisions, visit IRS.gov/taxreform.